Cuba
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Tip 99: Favorite Tips (part 1)

We appreciate anyone who read all #100days100traveltips that might have just taken a bit over 100 days.  But anything good is worth waiting for, right? 😉  Here’s a quick summary of our favorites:
Top Airport tip?
  • Rebecca – don’t expect USB charging ports to work – the hardly ever do – so you’ll want to carry a wall plug and find an outlet near a seat or in a restaurant
  • Michelle – buy a snack – you never know how long you’ll be on the flight
  • Sandy – bring a refillable water bottle

Top Hotel tip?

  • Rebecca – join the rewards programs and take advantage of dual reward credit earning with other travel partners like the rental car
  • Michelle – ask for a better room or upgrade, the worst they can say is no
  • Sandy –  be aware of resort fees!

Top Road trip tip?

  • Rebecca – look at the gas gauge to know which side to fuel up your rental car
  • Michelle – take lots of snacks, especially for driving at night
  • Sandy –  Look for fun opportunities to make fun pit stops along the way at unique places
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Tip 81: Avoiding Germs on Airplanes

As a frequent passenger on red-eye flights over the holiday season, I cringe as I try to fall asleep listening to a cacophony of sneezes and coughs. I walked onto the plane healthy and I’d like to walk off healthy in 6 hours, thank you very much!

To cut down on the germs surrounding you, pack small anti-bacterial hand sanitizer wipes with you. As soon as you get seated on the plane, wipe down the armrests, the table tray and any buttons used to control the entertainment system.

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Tip 77: Have copies of Passport

Luckily we haven’t needed it yet, but we scan and email ourselves copies of our passports before a big trip.

My parents like to take physical copies with them, but I have decided electronic copies are ok for now.

What has worked best for you? Have you found this helpful in the event a passport is stolen or lost?

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Tip 75: Cuba travel advice

Yesterday we shared a tip on making sure you carry toilet paper with you while visiting the island. That was honestly the best advice we got prior to our trip so it felt worthy a separate post.

Here are some other tips:

  • You will need a visa if traveling from the US. Airlines and cruise lines sell them. They are about $75/person and can be issued immediately.
  • CUC (Cuban Convertible Peso) is the main currency. There is another option, the Cuban Peso, bur that is more for locals. The CUC is pretty much dollar to US dollar but the exchange taxes the conversion of US dollars something like 13%. It is more advantageous to convert from Euros so we had planned ahead and brought those instead. Also, US banks cannot concert the cash for you so it is something you have to do once you are in Cuba.
  • As of this writing, you can bring back 100 cigars and 1 liter of rum duty free per adult traveler. It is best to buy both from official retailers to avoid fakes.
  • There are hundreds of classic cars for hire relatively inexpensively. A fun way to view the city!
  • Drink only from sealed, bottles beverages.

Havana highlights:

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Tip 74: Take Toilet Paper to Cuba

This may sound like super odd advice, but I was so thankful the cruise line gave us a heads up before we disembarked at Cuba. Sadly most charter buses (cruise excursions, included) and restaurants in Cuba did not have toilet paper. Also, many tourist stops and restaurants charged a dollar for access to a bathroom. Best to be prepared and carry a roll with you!

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Tip 73: Fastest customer care is through Twitter

All airlines, hotels, airports, etc now have Twitter and they usually monitor it something fierce.

Before you waste a lot of time standing in line to rebook a flight, as a example, hop on Twitter and send the airline customer service a note. In our experience the issue was resolved 2x faster than waiting in a physical line at the airport.

Go digital!

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Tip 61: Don’t Wait in Line When You Can Call for Assistance

No one is happy when a flight is cancelled.  All the angry customers are now lined up trying to get rebooked on the next flight.  In your head, you count the number of people in front of you and the likelihood that there are enough seats still available on that flight. Instead of just waiting at the counter, call the airline’s reservation office.  They too can book you on the next flight and, in our experience, it’s often faster than waiting in line.