Hiring leader episode
Podcast

Episode 25: Tips for Hiring Leaders

Special Guest: Michelle King

Tips:

  • Aim to ask specific questions to candidates so you get a real-life example of what actually happened and not a theoretical reply to how the candidate might handle the situation
  • Use follow up questions to probe on responses that are too vague to give you the level of detail you need
  • Assessments can help sort out some cultural elements but should be factored as only one of many data points in selection
  • In order to have legally defensible assessments in selection, there are a couple things to consider:
    • You have to use questionnaires that have been validated for selection. Most personality assessments are not a fit for selection assessment.
    • You have to show the characteristics you are measuring are job-specific.
  • Talk to everyone who has had contact with the candidate during the process. You might learn a lot from how the candidate has treated the receptionist.
  • Consider flexibility and remote options for the open role. Today’s workforce and talent supply requires us to be more creative in our thinking.
  • It’s now illegal in many states (e.g. California, Colorado, Illinois, etc.) to ask what a person is currently making in order to form your offer. You can ask the candidate’s expectations, but you should have knowledge of what the position is worth in the market in order to make the best compensation and total rewards strategy.
  • Pay transparency is a new trend but needs a lot of consideration around your culture and legal implications. There are many factors that influence pay and most often people are not informed on them.
  • Market data is worth investing in. Some websites also have credible salary information for free, but you have to use judgement on which to use.
diversity
Podcast

Episode 18: Bias

Show notes:

According to ECU, Equality challenge unit, unconscious bias refers to a bias that we are unaware of, and which happens outside of our control. It is a bias that happens automatically and is triggered by our brain making quick judgments and assessments of people and situations, influenced by our background, cultural environment and personal experiences.

Implicit bias refers to the same area, but questions the level to which these biases are unconscious especially as we are being made increasingly aware of them. Once we know that biases are not always explicit, we are responsible for them. We all need to recognize and acknowledge our biases and find ways to mitigate their impact on our behavior and decisions.

(Source: Harvard’s Project Implicit) The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is commonly used to measure implicit bias in individuals. The IAT measures the strength of associations between concepts (e.g., black people, old people, or gay people) and evaluations (e.g., good or bad) or characteristics (e.g., athletic, smart, or clumsy). The IAT is based on the observation that people place two words in the same category more quickly if the words are already associated in the brain. For example, the rate at which a person can link the words “black” or “white” with “good” or “bad” indicates their implicit bias.  

On an Ohio State University website they mention “Our brains are incredibly complex, and the implicit associations that we have formed can be gradually unlearned through a variety of debiasing techniques.” Some popular debiasing techniques include:

  • discounting commonly held stereotypes
  • using context to influence implicit responses
  • changing the way an out-group member is evaluated and categorised
  • using contact to change the level of threat evoked by an out-group
  • using motivation to change responses to an out-group
  • encouraging people to take responsibility for their implicit biases

Resources:

Good overview video: https://youtu.be/OoBvzI-YZf4

Thinking fast and slow – Daniel Kahneman

If you have any suggestions or recommendations to share on the topic, please comment so our readers and the Lead.Travel.Pray. team can benefit from this knowledge.

Check out our twitter feed to read or hear more about each of our core topics of leadership, global travel and faith. We appreciate you!

Header image with Dale Kreienkamp
Podcast

Episode 12: Personal Change

 

 

The Lead.Travel.Pray. team was excited to interview our first guest on this twelfth episode of this podcast we started exactly one year ago. Dale Kreienkamp, Author of How Long, O Lord, How Long? A Book of Devotions for the Unemployed & Those Who Love Him, joined us to talk about personal change, specifically how faith can guide us through things like unemployment.

Dale Kreienkamp is a Human Resources professional of 40 years who has served as an executive in the healthcare industry and as head of a successful consulting practice.  Dale has also served as a volunteer leader on numerous boards of directors, as well as in his home church.  Dale has experienced a personal journey of unemployment twice when, each time, his positions were eliminated in organizational restructuring. These personal experiences created a desire within him to help others impacted by unemployment through inspirational devotions.

Dale’s Email Address:  dale@howlongolord.org

Website: https://howlongolord.org/

Book Facebook Page- https://www.facebook.com/HowLongOLord/  [Searchable Handle: How Long Oh Lord?]

LinkedIn URL – https://www.linkedin.com/in/dalekreienkamp/ [Searchable Handle: Dale Kreienkamp]

people celebrating winning culture
Podcast

Episode 11: Culture

 

Show Notes:

Individuals each have a unique personality – beyond intelligence, appearance, etc. At Lead. Travel. Pray., we think about culture as the organization’s personality. It’s the collective way of “being” that makes it unique. It’s the “how we do things” layer to  “what we do”.

To better understand a culture during an interview or to diagnose a culture through employee/member focus groups, ask questions like…

  • How does work get done here?
  • How are decisions made? Who has the ultimate say?
  • What behaviors are rewarded?
  • What are characteristics or behaviors of people who do not fit?
  • What 3 words would you use to describe this place to friends and family?

From there you can work on what the employees want the organization to aspire to be and how to close the gaps.

There are also culture assessments that can assist in a more formal diagnosis. Here are some examples:

  1. Denison’s culture survey
  2. Organization Culture Inventory – Human Synergistics

 

Here are a few other resources we find handy for culture:

 

We’d enjoy hearing  what cultural attributes you find most rewarding at work, church, a volunteer organization or hobby group. Please comment below!

adult private conversation
Podcast

Episode 8: Candor

 

 

Show Notes:

  • Not all cultures have the same challenges with being candid.
  • Kim Scott’s Radical Candor book addresses “caring deeply and challenging directly”.
  • Candor requires courage in the moment – believing it’s worth it to say what needs to be said.
  • Reframing and getting curious about behavior helps us get at the “thing behind the thing” in a more authentic way.
  • Candor is not shooting from the hip – it requires preparation.
  • Some techniques can help us have a candid conversation like using I vs You language.
  • Our candor role models are very interested in what we are thinking but might not be saying and are willing to probe on it when he/she is attuned to the non-verbals.
  • Effective candor requires a person to be good with neutrality and desire to see things another way.
  • It might require some time and space – perhaps postponing the conversation – until you can get to a curiosity mindset before having the conversation.
  • The highest level of listening is listening with the intent of having your mind changed – not trying to think through your rebuttal.
  • Amygdala hijacks can be avoided if you position yourself to avoid the emotional threat response.
  • The DDI STAR and STAR/AR models are great models for sharing specific information for positive and constructive feedback.
  • Book recommendations:
Girl reading book by lake
Podcast

Episode 6: Self-Development

 

 

Show Notes:

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

  • More downtime is great like personal retreats, mindfulness, prayer, yoga and relaxing vacations
  • Gratitude journaling is a good method for reflecting on your blessings
  • Volunteer leadership opportunities can be very rewarding and are within everyone’s reach
  • 70-20-10 model of development

70/20/10 model of development
70/20/10 model of development

  • More frequent breaks help improve productivity, mindfulness and give you a chance to reflect
  • Accountability partners and coaches help keep you focused and give feedback on your progress
  • Book: Insight by Tasha Eurich
  • Ask for feedback by writing “What is something that might be getting in the way of me [fill in the blank with your development goal]?” on the front of a notecard.  Have your peer group respond with anonymous feedback on the back of that notecard. This feedback will be a major gift for your development.
  • Don’t try to climb the mountain to the top of your goal too quickly or you may find it overwhelming. Take baby steps and start the journey!
  • Book: FYI: For Your Improvement by Korn Ferry – look for used copies to save money; older editions are still quite useful
  • Book: Before Happiness by Shawn Achor
  • Book: Boundaries series by Henry Cloud & John Townsend
  • Brene Brown has created some wonderful resources in a variety of media formats including