Header image with Dale Kreienkamp
Podcast

Episode 12: Personal Change

 

 

The Lead.Travel.Pray. team was excited to interview our first guest on this twelfth episode of this podcast we started exactly one year ago. Dale Kreienkamp, Author of How Long, O Lord, How Long? A Book of Devotions for the Unemployed & Those Who Love Him, joined us to talk about personal change, specifically how faith can guide us through things like unemployment.

Dale Kreienkamp is a Human Resources professional of 40 years who has served as an executive in the healthcare industry and as head of a successful consulting practice.  Dale has also served as a volunteer leader on numerous boards of directors, as well as in his home church.  Dale has experienced a personal journey of unemployment twice when, each time, his positions were eliminated in organizational restructuring. These personal experiences created a desire within him to help others impacted by unemployment through inspirational devotions.

Dale’s Email Address:  dale@howlongolord.org

Website: https://howlongolord.org/

Book Facebook Page- https://www.facebook.com/HowLongOLord/  [Searchable Handle: How Long Oh Lord?]

LinkedIn URL – https://www.linkedin.com/in/dalekreienkamp/ [Searchable Handle: Dale Kreienkamp]

people celebrating winning culture
Podcast

Episode 11: Culture

 

Show Notes:

Individuals each have a unique personality – beyond intelligence, appearance, etc. At Lead. Travel. Pray., we think about culture as the organization’s personality. It’s the collective way of “being” that makes it unique. It’s the “how we do things” layer to  “what we do”.

To better understand a culture during an interview or to diagnose a culture through employee/member focus groups, ask questions like…

  • How does work get done here?
  • How are decisions made? Who has the ultimate say?
  • What behaviors are rewarded?
  • What are characteristics or behaviors of people who do not fit?
  • What 3 words would you use to describe this place to friends and family?

From there you can work on what the employees want the organization to aspire to be and how to close the gaps.

There are also culture assessments that can assist in a more formal diagnosis. Here are some examples:

  1. Denison’s culture survey
  2. Organization Culture Inventory – Human Synergistics

 

Here are a few other resources we find handy for culture:

 

We’d enjoy hearing  what cultural attributes you find most rewarding at work, church, a volunteer organization or hobby group. Please comment below!

adult private conversation
Podcast

Episode 8: Candor

 

 

Show Notes:

  • Not all cultures have the same challenges with being candid.
  • Kim Scott’s Radical Candor book addresses “caring deeply and challenging directly”.
  • Candor requires courage in the moment – believing it’s worth it to say what needs to be said.
  • Reframing and getting curious about behavior helps us get at the “thing behind the thing” in a more authentic way.
  • Candor is not shooting from the hip – it requires preparation.
  • Some techniques can help us have a candid conversation like using I vs You language.
  • Our candor role models are very interested in what we are thinking but might not be saying and are willing to probe on it when he/she is attuned to the non-verbals.
  • Effective candor requires a person to be good with neutrality and desire to see things another way.
  • It might require some time and space – perhaps postponing the conversation – until you can get to a curiosity mindset before having the conversation.
  • The highest level of listening is listening with the intent of having your mind changed – not trying to think through your rebuttal.
  • Amygdala hijacks can be avoided if you position yourself to avoid the emotional threat response.
  • The DDI STAR and STAR/AR models are great models for sharing specific information for positive and constructive feedback.
  • Book recommendations:
Girl reading book by lake
Podcast

Episode 6: Self-Development

 

 

Show Notes:

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • More downtime is great like personal retreats, mindfulness, prayer, yoga and relaxing vacations
  • Gratitude journaling is a good method for reflecting on your blessings
  • Volunteer leadership opportunities can be very rewarding and are within everyone’s reach
  • 70-20-10 model of development
70/20/10 model of development
70/20/10 model of development
  • More frequent breaks help improve productivity, mindfulness and give you a chance to reflect
  • Accountability partners and coaches help keep you focused and give feedback on your progress
  • Book: Insight by Tasha Eurich
  • Ask for feedback by writing “What is something that might be getting in the way of me [fill in the blank with your development goal]?” on the front of a notecard.  Have your peer group respond with anonymous feedback on the back of that notecard. This feedback will be a major gift for your development.
  • Don’t try to climb the mountain to the top of your goal too quickly or you may find it overwhelming. Take baby steps and start the journey!
  • Book: FYI: For Your Improvement by Korn Ferry – look for used copies to save money; older editions are still quite useful
  • Book: Before Happiness by Shawn Achor
  • Book: Boundaries series by Henry Cloud & John Townsend
  • Brene Brown has created some wonderful resources in a variety of media formats including
Podcast

Episode 2: Emotional Intelligence

Show Notes: 

  1. Self Awareness – recognize moods, emotions and drives
  2. Self-Regulation – control/re-direct disruptive impulses and moods; think before act
    • How to develop Self-Regulation: WAIT – Why Am I Talking?
  3. Motivation – passion to work for reasons beyond money & status
    • How to develop Motivation: Reframing – finding the good in difficult situations/interaction
  4. Empathy – understand emotional makeup of others; treating people according to emotional reactions
  5. Social Skills – managing relationships and building networks; find & build rapport

 

  • Emotional Intelligence benefits of travel
  • Faith’s role in emotional intelligence